Massachusetts lawmakers voted along party lines  to have you, the voting public, determine the destiny of the dumb "millionaire tax" on next year's ballot.

I haven't forgotten the 2018 state election, when I voted against what was called the Fair Share Amendment. The two names, millionaire tax or Fair Share, are interchangeable. Do you remember the advocates of the tax had it all sewn up, because they covered all the basis as best as it gets?

The Boston talking heads were sure the voters would overwhelmingly pass it. The amount of money supporting Fair Share was extraordinary. With kismet on their side, how could it fail? But it did fail, because voters saw right through it.

So now, the supporters of the millionaire tax say the proposed four percent surtax to households with annual earnings of more than $1 million. To draw your attention a little bit closer, they're talking about hard working households, not some guy with a skipper's cap on his yacht.

The families affected might have to decide whether to stay here or move to Rhode Island or New Hampshire. Compare the evidence from other states where this tax was passed and then taken down. We should learn from the errors of others. I forgot to tell you that the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled this tax to be unconstitutional.

But the biggest reason why this tax on top of a tax is terrible is because I didn't break my back all these years to be punished for it. I'll do everything legally possible to hold on to and protect the what I worked years to achieve. You now know that when I walk into the voting booth, how I'm going vote.

Phil Paleologos is the host of The Phil Paleologos Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact him at phil@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @PhilPaleologos. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

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