Is history repeating itself on December 21, 2020, when a very rare set of circumstances not seen in 800 years becomes visible?

Jupiter and Saturn will align to bring to pass what's referenced as the "Star of Bethlehem," the "Christmas Star," "Magen David," or "Star of David." From December 16-21, the solar system's two largest planets will position to appear to form a twice-as-large planet and a doubly brilliant luminescence, even though they're far apart. Astronomers say you'll be able to view the anomaly without binoculars, which can distort the rarity.

The alignment happens because of the planets' unique orbit around the sun. Jupiter orbits around the sun every 12 years, while Saturn orbits every 29 years. The two planets' exact ellipses are different, as well as their orientation; however, on December 21, they will be closest to each other in 800 years, since 1223.

There've been a lot of theories, mysteries and beliefs about the Star of Bethlehem that came into view at Christ's birth. You may be observing the same wonder on the 21st that's been described in the Holy Bible, Jewish scriptures and scientific journals, which gives pause and awe to this celestial marvel.

So, the question is: are we about to see the very same intense and blazing Star of Bethlehem that's been acclaimed since the birth of the Christ child? It's written that God put signs in the sky. Or was that Christmas Star over the manger an astronomical calibration? I believe the answer is the whole lot.

When I gaze up into the heavens on the 21st of December, I'll be seeing a partnership that supports a harmonious alignment of my biblical understanding combined with historical and astronomical insight, coming together to proclaim a believable explanation that is both understandable and miraculous, alongside each other.

– Additional reporting by GNB Voc-Tech intern Maddy Hanks

Phil Paleologos is the host of The Phil Paleologos Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact him at phil@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @PhilPaleologos. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

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