I roared when the newsreader trumpeted that Joe Biden and Kamala Harris don't trust President Trump because he's applying pressure, like a tourniquet, to the sizeable and extensive FDA to significantly expedite the release of the coronavirus vaccine ahead of the November election, or else.

The Trump opposition reminds me of laughable, simpleminded, merchants of gloom about the vaccine.

In April, I was sharing stories of hopeful anticipation from some Massachusetts research companies who were making global headlines about a possible vaccine, and now just five short months later, a lot of the media is talking about very deep concerns and why some are fearful of a pre-election vaccine, as stocks for AstraZeneca have plunged and a book now says President Trump knew the coronavirus could kill but downplayed it. Talk about spreaders of despair and despondency.

The cocksure attitude that America would soon find successful vaccine development to help us get back to some kind of normalcy has morphed into something vexatious, direful and dangerous.

All of a sudden, newspaper reports suggest scientists are worried about putting politics above evidence; the New York Times is worried and so is NPR and The Philadelphia Inquirer. They get today's Henny Penny Award. By the way, a henny penny is someone who panics at the slightest provocation.

In the end, they have successfully made laughable something that is not, and in a depraved way, they've made bad what was once good.

Phil Paleologos is the host of The Phil Paleologos Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact him at phil@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @PhilPaleologos. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

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