The terror attacks 20-years ago today in New York City, Washington and Pennsylvania were remembered Saturday during a ceremony outside New Bedford City Hall.

The terrorist attacks killed 2,977 people on the morning on September 11, 2001.

The New Bedford Fire Department used two aerial ladder trucks at William and Sixth Streets to hoist a giant American Flag over the intersection before the ceremony began shortly after 10 am.

Photo: New Bedford Mayor's Office

Among the speakers were New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell, leaders of local public safety departments, other city officials and members of the clergy.

Similar ceremonies were held throughout the region today.  Dartmouth staged a remembrance ceremony this morning at the Dartmouth Memorial Stadium on Slocum Road.

Chris Pereira, chairman of the Dartmouth Veterans Advisory Board told WBSM's Brian Thomas earlier Saturday, while serving in Afghanistan, he carried with him a photo of Leah Oliver, a 25-year old Dartmouth native who died in the attack on the World Trade Center.  He said the photo would often remind him about what he was fighting for.

A ceremony in Acushnet will start at 6 pm, outside the town Fire Station on Russell St.

See 20 Ways America Has Changed Since 9/11

For those of us who lived through 9/11, the day’s events will forever be emblazoned on our consciousnesses, a terrible tragedy we can’t, and won’t, forget. Now, two decades on, Stacker reflects back on the events of 9/11 and many of the ways the world has changed since then. Using information from news reports, government sources, and research centers, this is a list of 20 aspects of American life that were forever altered by the events of that day. From language to air travel to our handling of immigration and foreign policy, read on to see just how much life in the United States was affected by 9/11.