Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden was taken to a field in Deleware on Monday to deliver a speech on climate change and the wildfires that are devastating three western states. The former vice president has enough on his plate these days in battling President Donald J. Trump but had to do battle with some creepy crawlers too as he attempted to deliver his remarks.

Biden spoke in a field at the Deleware Museum of Natural History. I guess his handlers felt it would dress up the speech to have Biden appear out in the open. The tall grass and what appeared to this city slicker to resemble wheat – I don't know, maybe it was just weeds – reached up to the blue sky creating a real earthy look.

While the look was perfect, Biden's staff apparently didn't take into account that where there is tall grass, there are often bugs. Big bugs. Bugs are a distraction to anyone trying to speak in public but when your speaker has trouble remaining focused to begin with, the bugs can be a disaster.

And they were.

Getty Images

At one point, Biden wrestled with a critter that landed on the back of his neck. Another rather sizable bug landed on his shoulder. Biden alluded to the bug assault at least once during his remarks.

Props, intended or otherwise, can often upstage a candidate during a campaign appearance. Ask Mike Dukakis about his tank ride, or John Kerry about his bubble suit. Any time the viewer is paying attention to something other than the candidate's message, it's not a good thing. It's a distraction.

Because Biden is known for gaffes and other difficulties on the campaign trail, his every movement and utterance is under the microscope. The bugs didn't help folks to remain focused on Biden's message.

Memo to location coordinators: no more open fields!

Barry Richard is the host of The Barry Richard Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from noon to 3 p.m. Contact him at barry@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @BarryJRichard58. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

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