The Hollywood Reporter says we're just not laughing anymore. Comedy films are getting destroyed at the box office. People just don't seem to enjoy funny movies these days. Or perhaps the films just aren't very funny.

I used to enjoy going to the movies–back in the day when movies were good. I enjoyed many different types of films from Disney animation to action to westerns and comedies. You know, back when movies were good.

Something has happened to movies these days. It's tough to find anything interesting to see. Unless, of course, you are into computer-generated superheroes, remakes or sequels that should never have been made. The last film I saw was the live action Aladdin with Will Smith. That was pretty good.

The Hollywood Reporter says we seem to have lost our ability to laugh: "The last year comedies made more than $2 billion domestically was 2011. In 2009, they earned $2.5 billion, with six making more than $100 million domestically. But by 2015, comedy grosses were down to $1.4 billion, with four titles making more than $100 million. And last year, comedies earned only $1 billion, with a single release crossing the $100 million mark, 'Crazy Rich Asians.' (This excludes hybrids such as action comedies and comedy-dramas.)"

And this is true on television as well. Comedians like Jay Leno lament the loss of laughter in late night TV. Other comedians have expressed frustration about not being certain what is funny and what is offensive these days.

We need to laugh. Laughter is great medicine. We need to stop taking everything so seriously and just chill for a bit. If there is nothing worth taking the family to see at the theater, then find an old film On Demand or on your video shelf. Make it a good, old-fashioned comedy. Your family will appreciate the break from all of the seriousness out there.

Barry Richard is the host of The Barry Richard Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from noon to 3 p.m. Contact him at barry@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @BarryJRichard58. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.