No longer content to mold your children's thinking from kindergarten on, the social justice warriors want your newborns, too. The State House News Service reports legislation is pending on Beacon Hill to establish a universal system of early education and child care from birth to age five.

SHNS reports the legislation calls for a five-year rollout that prioritizes low-income families with the greatest need, and that "it would create a new direct-to-provider funding allocation, based on capacity rather than attendance." Under the plan, "families earning less than half the statewide median income would be able to access early education and child care options for free, and families above that threshold would pay up to seven percent of their total household income." The program would also cover after-school and out-of-school time for kids age 5-12, and special needs kids until age 15.

Since nothing is free, guess who picks up the tab for all of this? You do, of course, even if you do not have children or do not need the nanny state to be a babysitter and a teacher for your six-month-old.

The legislation is endorsed by a coalition of more than 120 groups and organizations, including the Coalition for Social Justice, Progressive Democrats of Massachusetts, and the SEIU Local 509, to name just a few.

The indoctrination of your children has been occurring in the public school system and higher ed for years. Now they are coming for the newborns and pre-schoolers. I can't think of anything I would want less for my child than the Coalition for Social Justice and Progressive Democrats of Massachusetts influencing their early thinking.

None of this is the government's business or responsibility anyway, and they should just stay out of it.

Barry Richard is the host of The Barry Richard Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from noon to 3 p.m. Contact him at barry@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @BarryJRichard58. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

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