According to an Associated Press story, there's been a settlement in the wrongful death lawsuit brought by the families of the two men Aaron Hernandez was acquitted of killing, then reinstated by the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts. While the lawyers kept the terms confidential, the lawyer for Hernandez' estate, New Bedford native George Leontire, one of the most brilliant lawyers in the nation, said no assets of the estate were used in the settlement.

But this piece isn't about what's been settled, but rather what's still very unsettling. There's been a lot of theories put forth to explain the downfall of this All-American at the University of Florida and teammate of Rob Gronkowski, forming one of football's most dominant tight-end duos.

Where and why did his downfall start? Some say his father's untimely death, when Aaron was only 16, filled him with anger and resentment and helped send him down the wrong path. His brother, his fiancée, and even local police, who saw him grow up, blamed the unsavory people he associated with–the losers of the world who deep inside hate to see their friends succeed. No doubt, his drug use fed his growing paranoia that led to the "spilled drink" Boston shooting.

Someone who was very close and personal to Aaron Hernandez told me about his genial and warmhearted side that the press never mentions. That may be, but I'm more familiar with the seedy side of his personal history. He was the direct opposite of Tim Tebow, his college quarterback. When you think about that match, it's hard to believe that on the same team was one of the best and one of the worst examples of players in college football.

I guess not even all of Tebow's goodness couldn't help guide Hernandez beyond the immense problems he harbored inside himself. But please, don't blame the spilled drink.

Phil Paleologos is the host of The Phil Paleologos Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact him at phil@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @PhilPaleologos. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.