Every family has a story. Take Red Sox shortstop Xander Bogaerts' ménage. His "Supermom," twin brother and his sister were abandoned when the father, Jan Maarten Bogaerts, left them like the telephone man who fell in love with long distances, as Tennessee Williams would say.

This 2018 World Series made 23 years since the dad flew the coop, deserting three-year-old Xander and his family. But through those demanding years, Sandra Brown, their hero mother, was adamant that they continue to communicate with him, in Hong Kong, on his birthday, Christmas and Father's Day, until they turned 18.

About five years ago, the father felt obliged to reconnect with his celebrity son in person during the 2013 World Series, but Xander just wasn't ready. That was then.

Who would have known this was going through Xander's mind as we watched him and his team go through an amazing season and postseason. And then the moment of illumination happened. Xander decided to call his father last week and ask if he and his wife would like to come to Los Angeles for Game 3 against the Dodgers.

I got weepy thinking about it and trying to put myself in the emotional reality of a father and son reunion. Xander's twin brother, Jair, and sister Chandra also were there, all brought together for the first time in 23 years.

No family is perfect. There are lots of curve balls and outs to contend with. In baseball, the shortstop's position between second and third base is considered among the most demanding. Xander says he's forgiven his father for everything. That's not easy to do,  because at times it feels more painful than the wound we suffered. And yet, it's so symbolic for this shortstop to remind us, as we cheer from the bleachers, that no runs can score in life without forgiveness.

Familia Ante Omnia: Family Above All.

Phil Paleologos is the host of The Phil Paleologos Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact him at phil@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @PhilPaleologos. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.