There are two dilemmas connected to the Parkland, Fla. tragedy. Mental health is the problem no one wants to talk about when it comes to school shootings.

The other is the one we don’t want to deal with—money. Washington won't spend the money needed to get real with the problem.

Until we face those two issues, this will continue to plague American society.

We asked our listeners to respond to the question: Is there a way we can stop mass shootings?

Jon Duarte: Thoughts and prayers and doing absolutely nothing. Those will definitely stop school shootings. Funny how England, Australia, Canada, Japan, South Korea, and pretty much any other developed country doesn't seem to have this issue. I wonder what their secret is??

Greg Blanchard: Mental evaluations, improving mental health treatment, a longer wait period for guns are a few ideas but people will find them and buy them outside of legal means so I have no idea.

Kevin Duggan: They had everything right in front of them to stop this. Another case of incompetence to keep children safe at schools and shifting the burden of blame to our wonderful country and laws.

Rena Strollo Lemieux: It is with a sad heart, that in my opinion, there needs to be uniformed guards, at every school. I read a suggestion that there are lots of retired police and military, could be good. It has to stop immediately. It’s not a democratic issue nor a Republican issue; It’s a human issue.

Ric Alves: Country is so screwed! All the gun shootings, out of control debt, crumbling infrastructure, health care is a mess, sick culture, shrinking middle class but it’s ok as the 1% is getting richer. Seems like the country has lost its ways on how to manage its people and society. Getting too big, we don’t know the left from the right and way too divisive. We are screwed! If this continues, we can all say RIP USA it’s been a good 100 years.

For more comments and to comment, go the visit WBSM's Facebook page.

Phil Paleologos is the morning host on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from noon-3 p.m. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.