With the midterm elections approaching, both Republicans and Democrats are attempting to tamp down expectations as they sweat out whether there will be a "red wave," blue wave" or no wave at all. It all comes down to voter turnout.

A campaign can raise oodles of cash, knock on every door and have the most professionally produced ads, but if they cannot motivate their voters to go the polls on election day, it is all for naught.

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President Trump frequently warns of voter apathy, which is common during midterm elections, and now former Democrat presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) is looking to quell the hopes of some that there will be a "blue wave" ushering Democrats into the majority in Congress.

Sen. Bernie Sanders in New Hampshire / Getty Images

Sanders played down those expectations in a chat with The Hill:

"I know a lot of people talk about this blue wave and all that stuff. I don't believe in it," he said. "I happen to believe on election night you're going to find a very very close situation and maybe a handful of votes determining whether Democrats gain control of the House and that we have an entity able to stand up to Trump, or we don't."

Apathetic and overly optimistic voters are equally as dangerous to candidates. Both can lead to supporters staying at home, believing either it's a lost cause, or that their candidate has it in the bag and doesn't need them to vote.

Always remember that the national media is largely dishonest, and polls reflect that dishonesty. Never believe a cause is lost or that victory is assured based on either. Make the commitment to a candidate and go out and vote on November 6.

Barry Richard is the host of The Barry Richard Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from noon to 3 p.m. Contact him at barry@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @BarryJRichard58. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.