The Fort Taber-Fort Rodman Military Museum will be participating in the Bells of Peace, the countrywide program that's designed to honor American men and women who served 100 years ago during World War I, especially the 116,516 who died.

The war ended by an armistice agreement between warring countries at 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918. The museum will be participating in the Bells of Peace at 11 a.m.

Then at 2 p.m., there will be a ceremony for the centennial of ending World War I, after which they'll have a grand opening of the museum's newest exhibit. That day, the museum's hours will be 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

At 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918, the fighting ended. Bells tolled around the world to mark the end of the Great War. The World War One Centennial Commission, along with the Pritzker Military Museum & Library, the Society of the Honor Guard of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the American Legion, and the Veterans of Foreign Wars are co-sponsors of the event.

Conceived and designed in collaboration with the nation’s veterans of service with the Honor Guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the bell tolling provides a solemn reminder of the sacrifice and service of veterans of World War I, and all veterans.

Bells will be tolled in communities across the nation, in places of worship, schools, town halls, public carillons, and cemeteries, to mark the centennial of the Armistice that brought an end to hostilities, in what Americans fervently hoped had been “The War to End All Wars.”

The Fort Taber-Fort Rodman Military Museum is located at 1000C Rodney French Blvd., New Bedford, and has earned the moniker of "the biggest little military museum in the country."

Phil Paleologos is the host of The Phil Paleologos Show on 1420 WBSM New Bedford. He can be heard weekdays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact him at phil@wbsm.com and follow him on Twitter @PhilPaleologos. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.